Audio Book

The Sunday Sermons Of The Curé D’Ars, Saint John Vianney, Part 1 Of 2, Complete Catholic Audiobook

The Sunday Sermons Of The Curé D’Ars, Saint John Vianney, Part 1 Of 2, Complete Catholic Audiobook

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Saint John Mary Vianney is the Patron Saint for Parish Priests. When you listen to his sermons, you may understand better why the Church gave him that title. Imprimatur 1901. Jean-Baptiste-Marie Vianney, T.O.S.F. (8 May 1786 – 4 August 1859), commonly known in English as St. John Vianney, was a French parish priest who is venerated in the Catholic Church as a saint and as the patron saint of parish priests. He is often referred to as the “Curé d’Ars” (i.e., Parish Priest of Ars), internationally known for his priestly and pastoral work in his parish in Ars, France, because of the radical spiritual transformation of the community and its surroundings. Catholics attribute this to his saintly life, mortification, his persevering ministry in the sacrament of confession, and his ardent devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. His feast day is 4 August. In 1818, shortly after the death of Balley, Vianney was appointed parish priest of the parish of Ars, a town of 230 inhabitants.[6] When Vianney’s bishop first assigned him to Ars, he got lost trying to find the town. Two young men tending flocks in the fields pointed him in the right direction.[8] With Catherine Lassagne and Benedicta Lardet, he established La Providence, a home for girls.[9] As parish priest, Vianney realized that the Revolution’s aftermath had resulted in religious ignorance and indifference, due to the devastation wrought on the Catholic Church in France. At the time, Sundays in rural areas were spent working in the fields, or dancing and drinking in taverns. Vianney spent time in the confessional and gave homilies against blasphemy and paganic dancing.[6] If his parishioners did not give up this dancing, he refused them absolution.[10] Abbé Balley had been Vianney’s greatest inspiration, since he was a priest who remained loyal to his faith, despite the Revolution.[11] Vianney felt compelled to fulfill the duties of a curé, just as did Balley, even when it was illegal.

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