Audio Books

The Happy Prince & Other Tales (Finding The Theme Of Redemption And The Afterlife)

The Happy Prince & Other Tales (Finding The Theme Of Redemption And The Afterlife)

The Happy Prince and Other Tales (sometimes called The Happy Prince and Other Stories) is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories: “The Happy Prince”, “The Nightingale and the Rose”, “The Selfish Giant”, “The Devoted Friend”, and “The Remarkable Rocket”.
The Happy Prince is another fairytale for grown-ups. It is the story of man’s passage through sacrifice and suffering to the resurrection. The kind swallow, disappointed in earthly love, found his joy in giving himself to others in partnership with the Happy Prince. They both gave themselves to the point of self-sacrifice. They went unnoticed by the world, but not by Our Lord in heaven in Whose footsteps they trod. It is one of a number of short stories written by Oscar Wilde in which he reveals his yearning for the redemption that is only possible through Jesus Christ within the Roman Catholic Church. He lived a mostly sinful and tortured life, wrote sublime poetry and witty plays, was imprisoned for immorality and finally converted on his deathbed.
The Nightingale and the Rose is a children’s story for grown-ups. It is a fairytale for the Garden of Gethsemane in which self-sacrificing love is left unheeded by souls wrapped-up with themselves and the world. It is one of a number of short stories written by Oscar Wilde in which he reveals his desire for the redemption that is only possible through Jesus Christ within the Roman Catholic Church. He lived a mostly sinful and tortured life, wrote sublime poetry and witty plays, was imprisoned for immorality and finally converted on his deathbed.
The Young King is another fairytale for grown-ups. It is the story of man’s redemption. Baptised into royalty, a soul must nevertheless abase itself and suffer in imitation of Christ before it can join Him the glory of His Resurrection.
The Star Child is another fairytale for grown-ups. It tells of a young boy, beautiful until he scorns his long lost mother (a figure of Our Lady) who reveals herself as a humble beggar; whereupon he is made ugly (a figure for sin) and is afflicted by the consequences of past cruelties to others. Bitter suffering brings him to humbly admit his faults and he sets out to find his mother again…. It is one of a number of short stories written by Oscar Wilde in which he reveals his yearning for the redemption that is only possible through Jesus Christ within the Roman Catholic Church. He lived a mostly sinful and tortured life, wrote sublime poetry and witty plays, was imprisoned for immorality and finally converted on his deathbed.
The Devoted Friend is another fairytale for grown-ups. It tells of a miller who considers himself to be a devoted friend to a poor flower grower named Hans. Hans is a model of unselfishness and generosity and he considers the friendship of the miller to be a privilege, but in reality the miller abuses the good nature of Hans. The moral of the story is this: those who are the most selfish are also the most blind about there selfishness.
The Remarkable Rocket is another fairytale for grown-ups. It tells of a firework whose immense pride gives him stratospheric illusions of grandeur … with inevitable consequences. Other fireworks play cameo roles as individual manifestations of pride – clearly mocking the different characters who grace the public stage of every epoque. The story is wittily crafted and engagingly narrated. It is one of a number of short stories written by Oscar Wilde in which he reveals his yearning for the redemption that is only possible through Jesus Christ within the Roman Catholic Church. He lived a mostly sinful and tortured life, wrote sublime poetry and witty plays, was imprisoned for immorality and finally converted on his deathbed.

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