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Thomas: (Pt.9) Islam did not come to Spain as you think!

Thomas: (Pt.9) Islam did not come to Spain as you think!

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Thomas now has his own YouTube channel here: @Thomas Alexander/videos

So, how exactly did Islam take over Spain?

The Standard Islamic Narrative (SIN) states that Spain was taken over and Islamicized during the 40 year period of the Rushidun caliphates (between 632 – 661 AD).

Thomas, however, disputes that claim categorically, claiming that Islam didn’t take over Spain in just 40 years, but over 200 years!

He points out that the Islamization of Spain was much longer and more arduous in the West, than what was happening in the East.

661 AD: Mu’awiya, the Umayyad caliph, headquartered in Damascus, chose that city to rule from as he wanted to be a protector of the sanctuary of John the Baptist. Why, if Mu’awiya was a Muslim, as the Standard Islamic Narratives tell us, would he chose to be the protector of the Christian sanctuary?

724 – 743 AD: al Hisham moved his capital from Damascus, to the backwater town of Resafa (near to the present day Raqqa), and made it Persian. Why would he go there? He went there because it was known then as Sergiopolis, a Christian pilgrimage site for the saint Sergius (an Arab Christian martyr). If he were a Muslim, then why would he choose a Christian pilgrimage site for his capital, away from the centers of power?

756 – 788 AD: Abd al-Rahman I fled from the Abbasids to North Africa and then to Spain, which was controlled by the Umayyads, along with the Berbers and the Arabs. He stopped the civil war there and took over power for himself, bringing with him Persian art, such as the Mesquita mosque, which was initially a church.

782 AD: Elipandus, an anti-Trinitarian, became the archbishop of Toledo, but didn’t gain power, proving that there was still a tussle with the Trinitarians at this late date.

839 AD: Abd al-Rahman II convenes a synod against a small Gnostic sect. Why did he not convene a synod against Islam? Because it hadn’t yet entered Spain even at this late date.

840 AD: Albar, the bishop of Cordoba in Spain wrote a letter against the anti-Trinitarians, proving that he wasn’t a Muslim. He mentioned that the anti-Trinitarians used the gospel of Matthew to support their theological claims. Why would they use Matthew and not the Qur’an for their defense, unless the Qur’an had not yet come to Spain? In fact, so far we find nothing Islamic in Spain, yet we are in the mid-9th century.

850 AD: The bishop Eulogius goes to the East to polemicize against the prophet Muhammad. This is the first time that we find the name Muhammad in Spain.

He is joined by Albar, the bishop in Cordoba, in condemnation of Islam, proving that Islam was still new to Spain.

All of this contradicts the Standard Islamic Narrative, which claims Islam came and dominated Spain between 634 – 661 AD, almost 200 years earlier!

Thomas maintains that there were certainly anti-Trinitarian movements in Spain in the 7th century and later; yet they used the Bible (i.e. the Gospel of Matthew) to support their beliefs instead of the Qur’an, which suggests that not only did Islam not exist this far west at that time, but neither did the Qur’an.

It was the Muslim Abd al-Rahman II who, after 850 AD finally brought Islam into Spain, persecuting Christians in the process. Yet the Trinitarians still opposed the Muslim conquest up to the 10th century.

Yet, Spain didn’t become completely Islamic until the rule of the Almoravids in the 12th century, when they introduced a much stricter form of Islam.

All of these points confront the Standard Islamic Narrative’s view of their own history!

But were the Muslims a benign and benevolent power in Spain, as we have been told (i.e. the “Andalusian Paradise”)? It is to that area that Thomas now turns his attention.

© Pfander Centre for Apologetics – US, 2021
(60,520) Music: “Epic Trailer” by Rafael Krux, from filmmusic-io

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